In These New Times

A new paradigm for a post-imperial world

Posts Tagged ‘disappearing insects’

More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas

Posted by seumasach on October 19, 2017

PLOS

18th October, 2017

Abstract

Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized protocol to measure total insect biomass using Malaise traps, deployed over 27 years in 63 nature protection areas in Germany (96 unique location-year combinations) to infer on the status and trend of local entomofauna. Our analysis estimates a seasonal decline of 76%, and mid-summer decline of 82% in flying insect biomass over the 27 years of study. We show that this decline is apparent regardless of habitat type, while changes in weather, land use, and habitat characteristics cannot explain this overall decline. This yet unrecognized loss of insect biomass must be taken into account in evaluating declines in abundance of species depending on insects as a food source, and ecosystem functioning in the European landscape.

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Harmful Effects of GSM Waves Demonstrated on Ants and Protozoa

Posted by seumasach on July 25, 2012

Mieux Prevenir

23rd July, 2012

Thank you to Teslabel for the following Press Release, which was originally published on their site in French. (www.teslabel.be)  Original article in French.

Harmful Effects of GSM Waves Demonstrated on Ants and Protozoa A first in Belgium: Studies conducted at the Université Libre de Bruxelles show clearly that GSM waves affect the memory and response to pheromones in ant colonies, and that they worsen the motility of cell membranes of protozoa. 

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Sense of Smell and Sight Perturbed in Ants Exposed to GSM Radiation: Study at Université Libre, Brussels

Posted by seumasach on July 25, 2012

Mieux Prevenir

17th July, 2012

The European editors of two international journals refused to publish this Belgian study which shows serious perturbations in the olfactory and visual memories of ants exposed to electromagnetic radiation similar to that surrounding GSM and communication masts. The American journal, “Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine” accepted the study for publication in June 2012. Thank you to Teslabel for this information (www.teslabel.be).  Original article in French.

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Mystery of the vanishing sparrow

Posted by seumasach on November 22, 2008

 

 

So all we need now is to find out why the insects are disappearing. ITNT is not offering any prizes for peer-reviewed studies on this question since EM radiation is already being used commercially to eliminate insects. Given the growing level of electrosmog it is questionable how long this will continue to be commercially viable. Perhaps that is why they’re moving on to using it against rats, an inspirational business start-up in contemporary Britain. The effect of EM on insects has been confirmed to me by Duncan MacFadyean, chief scientific officer for Oppenheimer’s. What kind of future do we face without insects? A short one.

 

 

Independent

20th november, 2008

 

It’s taken eight-and-a-half years – but The Independent’s £5,000 prize for explaining the disappearance of the house sparrow from our towns and cities finally has a serious entry, with a serious theory.

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